What I’ll miss about California

5 Feb
2008

My sejour here in California is starting to wind down and I began to realize there are a lot of things I will miss about CA.
In no particular order:

  • The Berkeley Bowl- the best produce, cheese grocery store around
  • My SUV
  • Customer service
  • Cable TV and VOD
  • Clubbing until 4 am
  • Cheap alcohol and an myriad selection of it
  • Clubbing until 5am
  • Seeing the city skyline every time I cross the Bay Bridge
  • Going to Napa valley when I feel like it
  • Driving 300 miles and still being stuck in CA
  • Really cheap gas
  • Non toll highways
  • People smiling and chatting wherever you go
  • Dunkin Donuts
  • 24 hour stores
  • My SUV
  • The Kitchen Aid Mixer
  • Clubbing until 6am and watching the sunrise
  • Cheap, tasty Mexican food
  • Visiting Lake Tahoe and going snowboarding
  • Hiking in Marin Country and watching the sunrise
  • Yes, my SUV…having no wheels in Sweden may just kill me
  • Late night anything

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14 Responses to What I’ll miss about California

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HairySwede

February 21st, 2008 at 12:55

Yup… it takes a while to get used to some things! But its an adventure. And its fun.

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Tuva

March 1st, 2008 at 03:03

Sweden is bigger than California so you can drive even more than 300 miles (a lot more) and still being “stuck” in Sweden too. Just trying to cheer you up :P

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Tuva

March 1st, 2008 at 03:05

I just wonder where in Sweden are you moving to? I would reccomend Göteborg (Gothenburg) . but maybe you’ve already chosen another palce?

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Erik

March 14th, 2008 at 17:23

You can go clubbing to really late in sweden too. And non toll highways are the only kind we have in sweden.

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Sapphire

March 19th, 2008 at 00:43

Tuva- I already picked snooty, sister city of Stockholm to live in. Maybe one day I’ll send myself down to Göteborg.

Erik- Okay, yay for some late night clubbing! And when you enter Sthlm you have to pay toll (10-20kr) …I guess it could be better than bridge tolls in CA.

And what I really miss now, going to to the store at the time I want to to buy alcohol. Ohhh…the Systembolaget.

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Daniel

September 18th, 2008 at 19:25

Tbh you cant say that systembolaget has a small selection.
I find it well stocked of the common beers and you are also able to get alcohol from small producers in far away counties. And if you know of certain sort of lets say wine, that you want and don’t see in the lists you can get them to import it.

But anyways I find it interesting to read about how you see us Swedes so welcome to “favoriter”

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Der alte Schwede

February 21st, 2009 at 15:45

Dunkin Donuts? How about Krispy Kreme

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Nour

May 22nd, 2012 at 15:06

Hi every one . I moved from Sweden to Michigan , but I still miss Stockholm’s night my favored place 360 club and I lived in San Diego . Ca really awesome city .it is the Best for night . When I was at San Diego down town . I remembered kongsgotan . I like Stockholm night . I like to meet friends from Sweden live in USA .
Lycka till

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Nour

May 22nd, 2012 at 15:08

My mail . Nour_abdalnour at yahoo dot com

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laaarsj at gmail.com

December 12th, 2012 at 00:15

Oh wow.. and now we are supposed to be so jealous and impressed by this list that reveals how wordly and cool you are with an underlying meaning that things are just *a little* better over there .. I couldn’t care less but didn’t know cheap gas prices, 24h stores and cable tv could make anyone longing for home so much. Pretty sad if that’s all. It reinforced my prejudiced view on American mentality and what the culture is about. Gas prices. SUVs. cheap booze (sorry Americans but you you’ve got a long way to go when it comes to beer). Sure, fine.
However. I’ve noticed Americans love to compare things. Why is this obsession with comparisons and what’s the point? .. Is it supposed to be some sort of competition? .. It seems like everything is about quantity and not quality for you people.
I’d advice you to step down from your high horses, buy a damn train ticket and get the hell out of the Stockholm duck pond for once and see what the country is really about. The assholes of Stockholm (which is in fact a bunch of imported hill billies who think they have to act like assholes to fit into the career crowd) isn’t exactly known in the rest of the country for being the nicest people around, but rather for being stuck-up, rude, cold and self-centered. The difference from the rest of country couldn’t be any bigger!. It would be like saying rude New Yorkers represent all Americans or all Americans are gun crazy extreme right christians just because they might be in some parts of the country. How about that? .. Frankly, you don’t seem to be the most open minded person yourself, rather a judgemental, arrogant, ignorant, disrespectful bimbo that doesn’t seem to be able to think outside the box and who thinks it’s totally ok to put up hate lists on things that don’t satisfy your taste buds without really knowing anything at all or even try to understand. Let me tell you something, you’re fighting against windmills here and people will never show a person like you respect if you insist to continue with that attitude.

You have to understand that Sweden is a very longish country with different climates and people living under different conditions, so the difference bewteen all the local cultures and mentalities that have developed over time to adapt to the conditions can be abysmal.

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laaarsj at gmail.com

December 12th, 2012 at 01:15

About the customer service. No, Swedes prefer not to become attacked by staff with dollarsigns in their eyeballs every time they visit a store. Shopping is not supposed to be a war you know. Perhaps in US, but not in Sweden and Europe so you better get used to it. People here aren’t helpless, incompetent babies who need assistance every second as it seems be the case in Californa according to you. Swedes want to be able to take their time to look around first and prefer to ASK in case they might need help with something. Everything else would just be considered as intrusive. The staff always greet you welcome to show you attention though, but don’t give you a mad eyes if you have taken their time but leave without buying anything. In Swedish culture it’s very important with trustful long term relationships and this also applies to the relation between retailers and customers. People like to visit the same stores or retailers because they know they can trust them to be able to get help in the best way without unecessary formalities or get help if any troubles would show up after the purchase. I never saw anyone chasing me around when I visited Macy’s and lots of other stores in NYC last year. How un-American you might think. It would be totally unthinkable to bargain on things in a store in US as well as opposed to Sweden. I mean, it’s the little things, like “If I’m going to buy the laptop you have to include a mouse too in the price.” I’ve done this often in stores but I doubt it would even be possible in US. However, in this country the retailers know they know I’ll come back to them if they do.

In contrast to this, I’ve had some really bad experiences with American online retailers. They were being very helpful until had made my purchases. However, several of the retailers proved to be unreliable and plain fuck ups when they sent me the wrong items several times and when I complained and demanded them to pay the return and back shipping for replacements they refused despite being their own faults! It’s like the customers have no rights in US. So much for great American service you talk about. In Europe customers are much more protected through customer rights legislations that retailers have to abide to. I’ve never had problems with this when I’ve ordered stuff from other EU countries. I hope it’s not what the general American service is about but from now on I’ve become much more careful if I buy pricier stuff from American retailers.

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laaarsj at gmail.com

December 12th, 2012 at 01:35

Speaking about mexican food. A friend of mine of latin descent who’s from California told me that many Americans who stuff their faces with burritos and fajitas many times unknowingly actually have minced sheep brain served in a wrap due to that they don’t understand the spanish menus. Keep that in mind next time you’re having a lovely smelling burrito. You can never be sure what’s in it. ;D

I prefer a cheap Kebab.

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laaarsj at gmail.com

December 12th, 2012 at 03:07

About the customer service. No, Swedes prefer not to become attacked by staff with dollarsigns in their eyeballs every time they visit a store. Shopping is not supposed to be a war you know. Perhaps in US, but not in Sweden and Europe so you better get used to it. People here aren’t helpless, incompetent babies who need assistance every second as it seems be the case in Californa according to you. Swedes want to be able to take their time to look around first and prefer to ASK in case they might need help with something. Everything else would just be considered as intrusive. The staff always greet you welcome to show you attention though, but don’t give you a mad eyes if you have taken their time but leave without buying anything. In Swedish culture it’s very important with trustful long term relationships and this also applies to the relation between retailers and customers. People like to visit the same stores or retailers because they know they can trust them to be able to get help in the best way without unecessary formalities or get help if any troubles would show up after the purchase. I never saw anyone chasing me around when I visited Macy’s and lots of other stores in NYC last year. How un-American you might think. It would be totally unthinkable to bargain on things in a store in US as well as opposed to Sweden. I mean, it’s the little things, like “If I’m going to buy the laptop you have to include a mouse too in the price.” I’ve done this often in stores but I doubt it would even be possible in US. However, in this country the retailers know they know I’ll come back to them if they do.

In contrast to this, I’ve had some really bad experiences with American online retailers. They were being very helpful until had made my purchases. However, several of the retailers proved to be unreliable and plain fuck ups when they sent me the wrong items several times and when I complained and demanded them to pay the return and back shipping for replacements they refused despite being their own faults! It’s like the customers have no rights in US. So much for great American service you talk about. In Europe customers are much more protected through customer rights legislations that retailers have to abide to. I’ve never had problems with this when I’ve ordered stuff from other EU countries. I hope it’s not what the general American service is about but from now on I’ve become much more careful if I buy pricier stuff from American retailers.

Avatar

laaarsj at gmail.com

December 12th, 2012 at 03:13

@G

Spot on!
And stop acting like the US would be some f****** norm that the rest of the world is supposed to adapt to. You’re not the center of the universe. What works in US doesn’t necessarily work in other parts of the world and vice versa. One size doesn’t fit all.

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